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carnetdeculture:

Marguerite GÉRARD, La Leçon de Piano 

(via valinaraii)

Source: books0977
Audio

ruhevoll:

This’ll be my last Christmas post until next year. Going out with a bang, I guess.

Personent hodie
Anonymous, 1582

1. Personent hodie
Voces puerulae,
Laudantes iucunde
Qui nobis est natus,
Summo Deo datus,
Et de virgineo
Ventre procreatus.

2. In mundo nascitur;
Pannis involvitur;
Praesepi ponitur
Stabulo brutorum
Rector supernorum;
Perdidit spolia
Princeps Infernorum.

3. Magi tres venerunt;
Munera offerunt;
Parvulum inquirunt,
Stellulam sequendo,
Ipsum adorando,
Aurum, thus et myrrham
Ei offerendo.

4. Omnes clericuli,
Pariter pueri,
Cantent ut angeli:
'Advenisti mundo:
Laudes tibi fundo
Ideo: Gloria
In excelsis Deo’.

(via harmoniamundiusa)

Source: ruhevoll
Photo Set

valinaraii:

Things that only can happen during a New Year’s Concert in Vienna.

Source: valinaraii
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unejeunedemoiselle:

Viola d’Amore  Giovanni Grancino (Italian, Milan 1637–1709 Milan)

(via aculturedcitizen)

Source: unejeunedemoiselle
Text

adambosze:

OUR NICE BIG CHILI

Source: adambosze
Photo

beatusmusicus:

Harpsichord by Andreas II Ruckers (1646)

(via sirjavionidas)

Source: facepalmmozart
Photo Set

callasassoluta:

Maria Callas at the curtain calls for a performance in a concert (London, 1959).

(via mozartmozart)

Source: callasassoluta
Photo Set

wodzinska:

Female Composers of the Romantic Era:
The Male Composers stole the spotlight but the females were just as talented

When you hear about composers from the Romantic era or earlier, many people automatically assume that they are learning about a male, because they dominated the industry in an era where a woman’s place was not in the spotlight. Contrary to what many people believe, there are some extraordinarily talented female composers that called the Romantic era home, and it is high time that these exceedingly gifted composers take their rightful place in the spotlight. Here is a look at the lives and achievements of three brilliant female composers of the Romantic era.

Josephine Lang

One of the most famous female composers of the Romantic era was Josephine Lang. Born in 1815, Lang was born into a most musical family. Her mother was a soprano, her grandmother a coloratura soprano, her father a music director, and several aunts who each possessed musical ability. She was educated in Munich and composed many brilliant pieces of music. Some of her best works include “Erinnerung,” “Der Winter,” and “Herbst Gefuhl.”

Clara Wieck Schumann

Another exception female composer of the Romantic era is Clara Wieck Schumann. Born in 1819 to Friedrich Wieck, a piano company owner, and Marianne Tromlitz, a soprano vocalist, Clara Wieck Schumann had music flowing in her veins from birth. At a very young age, she was recognized by other famous composers as a tremendously gifted child prodigy. Some of her admirers include Robert Schumann, Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Nicolo Paganini and others. Some of her best works include “Nocturno, Op. 6, No. 2,” “Tre Romances, Op. 11,” and “Souvenir de Vienne, Op. 9.”

Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel

Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel has not received even a sliver of the praise she deserves as a composer of the Romantic era. Born in 1805, she is the sister of Felix Mendelssohn and showed outstanding musical skill and talent as a child prodigy. History lends the story that at the age of 13, Fanny played all 24 pieces from Bach’s “Well-Tempered Clavier” by memory alone. Fanny would grow into a tremendous composer of the age whose compositions resounded with passion and intensity. Some of her best works include “Trio in D Minor,” “Melodie, Op. 4 No. 2,” and “Aus Meinen Tranen.” [x]

(via bachtothefugue)

Source: hauptstimme
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carminagf:

A Pageant of Childhood. 1899. Thomas Cooper Gotch 

(via eskisanat)

Source: carminagf
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Photo Set

hexahemeron:

handsome Johannes Brahms in his 20

(via louisnicolasdavout)

Source: hexahemeron
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composersillustrated:

Fredrick Delius by Christian Krohg

(via composersillustrated)

Source: Wikipedia
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catonhottinroof:

Eugène Jansson   At the piano

Always women sitting at the piano.

(via thepianoblog)

Source: catonhottinroof
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egyedieset:

tothpeter65:

Jaj, Guido, Guido, mit tettél?!

Perelhetne minden későbbi zeneszerzőt plágiumért!

(via enyedieset)

Source: tothpeter65
Link

Aram Khachaturian: an Introduction

Not well edited but still informative short film about Khachaturian.